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Scottish Burgh Survey

A selection of Scottish Burgh titles

The Scottish Burgh Survey is a guide to archaeological resource in towns, published by the Council of British Archaeology on behalf of Historic Scotland. It helps to influence decision-makers and to set the agenda on questions that may be answered by archaeology where development occurs.

This third series of Burgh Surveys is intended to furnish local authorities, developers and residents with reliable information to help manage the archaeology and historic environment of Scotland's urban centres.  It offers comprehensive and consistent base-line information against which research, regeneration, and land-use planning objectives may be set.  It also guides the general reader in researching the rich history and archaeology of Scotland's historic burghs.

Available titles are shown in alphabetical order below.

Historic Barrhead

This book identifies medieval sites and charts the development of the town from the scatter of fermtouns shown on early maps.  It goes on to sketch the social history of a community shaped by the industrial revolution.  The authors look at the history and archaeological potential of key sites in the town, to inform the future management of Barrhead's historic environment.

More information and orders via Oxbow books

Historic Dunbar

Dunbar's rich past is reflected in the diversity of its surviving archaeology - prehistoric enclosures to the south of the town,Iron Age and and Anglian settlement in Castle Park, the medieval castle, its friary, tolbooth, parish church, as well as later buildings such as the Belhaven Brewery and the harbour warehouses.  The authors look at the archaeological potential of key sites in the town to direct more detailed research and further conservation of Dunbar's heritage.

Last few copies available on enquiry direct from the CBA.

Historic Fraserburgh

This book examines Fraserburgh's historic development from the late medieval period, when it was laid out to a continental-style grid, to its heyday as a fishing port in the early twentieth century. The town has received very little archaeological  investigation so the authors consider where the areas of archaeological potential lie, in order to inform future management.

More information and orders via Oxbow books

Historic Galashiels

The surviving buildings reflect the town's development, from post-medieval tower houses to the grand villas and workers' housing of the nineteenth century. The town has received little archaeological investigation to date, so the authors consider areas of particular archaeological potential to influence future management of Galashiel's built and natural landscape. The book concludes with a gazateer of all the town's mills.

Last few copies available on enquiry direct from the CBA.

Historic Kilsyth

Charts the developemt of the historic town of Kilsyth from the scatter of ferm touns in the area in the late 1500s, through to the elevation of Kilsyth to a burgh of barony in 1620 and the subsequent expansion of the 'new town', serving as a market and a centre of the textile industry. Part of the Scottish Burgh Survey - a series designed to identify the archaeological potential of Scotland's historic towns.

More information and orders via Oxbow books

Historic Kirkintilloch

This survey offers an accessible and broad-ranging synthesis of the history and archaeology of Kirkintilloch, Dunbartonshire, and aims to inform conservation guidance for future development. Kirkintilloch lies at a key point in Scotlands central belt. Here, by accident of geography, the Antonine Wall, ancient and modern route ways and the Forth and Clyde Canal pass within yards of each other. Here also, iron founding was added to the linen and cotton weaving industry giving Kirkintilloch an important role in Scotlands nineteenth-century economic development. The town has benefited from archaeological investigations in advance of development, and those designed to enhance our knowledge of the Antonine Wall. The authors consider where the areas of archaeological potential lie, in order to inform future management of Kirkintillochs historic environment, and pose questions about the evolution of Scotlands burghs.

More information and orders via Oxbow books

Historic Mauchline

This survey provides an accessible and broad-ranging synthesis of existing knowledge on historic Mauchline, as well as offering conservation guidance for future development.  The authors look at the archaeological potential of key sites in the town to direct more detailed research and further conservation of Mauchline's heritage.

More information and orders via Oxbow books

Historic Maybole

This volume traces the industrial growth and thriving economic life of 19th-century Maybole, with new civic building, factory developments and residential expansion.  The rapid changes of the last century are fully explored, and an evaluation made of the surviving evidence.  The authors look at the archaeological potential of key sites in the town to both direct more detailed research and help protect Maybole's heritage.

Last few copies available on enquiry direct from the CBA.

Historic Tain

This book examines Tain's historic development through the medieval period, the significance of its shrine and related 'Immunity', and its tranformation into a commercial centre.  The town has received very little archaeological investigation and the authors consider where the areas of archaeological potential lie, in order to inform the future management of Tain's historic environment. Distinctive building types are identified and the characterisation of the town is mapped.

Last few copies available on enquiry direct from the CBA.

Historic Whithorn

This book examines Whithorn's historic development from the earliest settlement, through the medieval period, to its subsequent role as a market town.  In the past, the town and the Isle have received less archaeological attention than the priory, so the authors consider the potential of physical evidence to inform future management.  Distinctive building types are identified and the character of the town is mapped.

Last few copies available on enquiry direct from the CBA.

Historic Wigtown

This book examines both the town’s political history, as it passed between the earldoms of Wigtown and Douglas, and its economic history, as it competed with Whithorn, before its eventual decline in the later nineteenth century. The authors use the surviving buildings to examine the development of the town from the medieval to the modern period.

More information and orders via Oxbow books

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