Archaeology rocks- Council for British Archaeology

Archaeology Matters

Conferences and events

A comprehensive list detailing various conferences, which will be taking place over the next few months.

*Any events posted on here are subject to change - please contact the event organisers with any queries

garden arch

Garden Archaeology 

Hosted by The Gardens Trust

April 6th - May 4th

Archaeology is the study of the past through its material remains, or as someone wittily put it: archaeology is rubbish. But that vital evidence on the ground is used to inform future restoration projects and conservation management plans.

The Gardens Trust are running an exciting new series of online talks exploring garden archaeology. Their distinguished and popular speakers Mark Newman, an Archaeological Consultant at the National Trust, and Stephen Wass from Polyolbion Archaeology will be reporting on current and on-going archaeology at various sites with a particular interest in the seventeenth century.

They will be discovering what garden archaeology is and how it is done, as well as looking at various sites such as the water gardens at Packwood House, Seaton Delaval and Beningbrough Halls and some lost wonders in Oxfordshire.

Join us for this series of 5 online talks which starts on Tuesday April 6th @ 10am, £20 for the series, or £5 for an individual session.  The talks will all be recorded and available for a week, so that you can listen again at your leisure. To find out more  go to The Gardens Trust Events here, or to book tickets go directly to Eventbrite here

Week 1. April 6. Introduction

Week 2. April 13. Oxfordshire’s Lost Wonders

In the seventeenth century Oxfordshire was home to two remarkable gardens that shared a reliance on technology to indulge the enthusiasms of their owners and impress their visitors. The Enstone Marvels are well known, and recent archaeological research has been able to document some extraordinary survivals. The great gardens at Hanwell were the site of a community termed the New Atlantis and excavations there have uncovered remains of a ‘House of Diversion’ together with a unique assemblage of terracotta gardens urns from the period.

Stephen Wass is a researcher, about to complete his D. Phil. on the subject of seventeenth-century water gardens. In addition, he works as a commercial archaeologist. In this capacity most of his projects involve historic gardens and he is currently occupied with a series of archaeological investigations connected with the latest programme of restoration at Stowe Landscape Gardens near Buckingham. He is also working to set up a new research programme alongside the Oxfordshire Gardens Trust into the ‘lost’ Tudor and Jacobean gardens in the county.

Week 3. April 20. Finding Vanished Beningbroughs

Beningbrough Hall, 8 miles north of York, appears to the archetypal Baroque house, set in seemingly timeless, unchanging, parkland to match. However, over 30 years of National Trust archaeological research has and continues gradually to reveal how far that perception is from the truth, rediscovering the splendours and mysteries of medieval, Stuart and Georgian Beningbroughs no longer visible to the eye. Long term archaeological research, partly on its own merits but mainly arising from mitigation for the impacts of standard operational property needs, is the only available key to unlock the past of this estate with virtually no surviving archives.

Mark Newman M.A., M.C.I.f.A, F.S.A., is the National Trust’s Archaeological Consultant for the east side of its North region, helping to advise and support the conservation of National Trust properties between Berwick and the boundaries of Great Manchester. He was first employed by the Trust on the project building the visitor centre at Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal in 1988 and has advised (as well as avidly explored) the property ever since. Mark’s work for the National Trust covers an enormous range of development and research projects spread across approximately 75 properties, many concerned with the archaeology of parks and gardens. The long-term perspective of the organisation sets the scene for developing an exceptionally curious and accumulative research approach, put to full use in advising conservation.

Week 4. April 27. The Water Garden at Packwood

How to dismantle a dam, a programme of investigation and restoration at Packwood House, Warwickshire, and an examination of the English water garden. Stephen Remedial work to the dam below the Great Pool at Packwood House enabled, over the course of four years, a detailed account to be prepared of the construction and functioning of the dam together with a wider consideration of the part that water played in the early garden there, Documented features included an Elizabethan moated garden, important seventeenth century timber drains and relics of the wild parties from the early twentieth century.

Stephen Wass is a researcher, about to complete his D. Phil. on the subject of seventeenth-century water gardens. In addition, he works as a commercial archaeologist. In this capacity most of his projects involve historic gardens and he is currently occupied with a series of archaeological investigations connected with the latest programme of restoration at Stowe Landscape Gardens near Buckingham. He is also working to set up a new research programme alongside the Oxfordshire Gardens Trust into the ‘lost’ Tudor and Jacobean gardens in the county.

Week 5. May 4. Seaton Delaval Hall, a Curtain Rises

Seaton Delaval Hall, near Blyth in Northumberland, long famed as the northern exemplar of Sir John Vanbrugh’s 'castle style’ mansions, was acquired by the National Trust (with unparalleled local community fundraising support) in 2009. The most recent and largest programme of National Lottery Heritage Fund-supported conservation works, the “Curtain Rises” project, is just coming to a crescendo including important restoration of the gardened grounds around the hall. This work has been based on over five year’s archaeological research designed to understand the hall’s original gardens more completely and identify where its archaeological remains survive so that they can be effectively protected. The result is a complete redrawing of the understanding of the C18 landscape design, its authors, and the extent of the Northumberland landscape it encompassed.

Mark Newman M.A., M.C.I.f.A, F.S.A., is the National Trust’s Archaeological Consultant for the east side of its North region, helping to advise and support the conservation of National Trust properties between Berwick and the boundaries of Great Manchester. He was first employed by the Trust on the project building the visitor centre at Fountains Abbey and Studley Royal in 1988 and has advised (as well as avidly explored) the property ever since. Mark’s work for the National Trust covers an enormous range of development and research projects spread across approximately 75 properties, many concerned with the archaeology of parks and gardens. The long-term perspective of the organisation sets the scene for developing an exceptionally curious and accumulative research approach, put to full use in advising conservation.

A Community Archaeologist's Introduction to Geographical Information Systems 

Six Evenings 8th April - 13th May at 7.30 - 9.30pm 

QGIS (sometimes called Quantum GIS) is used for many different mapping tasks which need to be carried out by community archaeologists as part of their projects. Professional archaeologists are likely to use expensive software which is usually out of reach of community groups.

This course is designed for the complete beginner to Geographical Information Systems. There will be plenty of opportunities to practice what is covered each week during lockdown. You will be told how to download the version of QGIS that will be used on the course. The software is free. Delegates will receive tuition notes via email, which they can append during the course. This on-line course was successfully run during 2020 by South Leeds Archaeology. It is being offered this year as part of the CBA Yorkshire Initiatives to continue to support Community Archaeology during the Covid situation and initially open to only CBA Yorkshire members.

Course Dates: 8th April - 15th April - 22nd April - 29th April - 6th May - 13th May

Course Fees: The course fee is £60.00 for members of CBA Yorkshire.

The proceeds from this course will be added to the funding for the CBA Yorkshire Grants and Awards Scheme.

To apply: Email Mike Turpin at associate.editor@cba-yorkshire.org.uk

The course will be limited to twelve participants. 

Applications should be in by Friday 26th February. 

Tintagel in Late Antiquity - Recent Excavations and Research

*POSTPONING UNTIL OCTOBER 2020/APRIL 2021*

This is a two-day conference organised by English Heritage at Truro College, Cornwall, followed by a half-day field trip to Tintagel Castle.

Tintagel Castle, Cornwall, is a site of international importance thanks to the remarkable archaeological evidence for a citadel and trading port in Late Antiquity. This conference will draw together the results of a major four-year research project, which included the first excavations since those by Glasgow University in the 1990s.

The conference papers will present results of the Tintagel Castle Archaeological Research Project. Speakers will include archaeologists from English Heritage, Cornwall Archaeological Unit, Historic England and several universities.

We have kept the ticket price as low as possible: it includes the conference fee and refreshments. There will be a social event on the Thursday night (with a reasonable additional cost) if you'd like to come.

Do make use of Visit Truro, or any other website, to book your own accommodation: https://www.visittruro.org.uk/truro-accommodation

To book tickets for the conference please use this link: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/tintagel-in-late-antiquity-recent-excavations-and-research-tickets-84875686463

Fifth Annual Pitt Rivers Lecture: 2021

Rapa Nui (Easter Island): Myths and realities of an iconic past

By Professor Sue Hamilton (UCL Institute of Archaeology, London)

Tuesday 26 October 2021 7:00pm (Displays and networking from 6:30pm)

This free public lecture will be delivered live in the Fusion Building, Talbot Campus, Bournemouth University BH12 5BB and also available via Zoom.

For further details, registration, and updates please visit the Eventbrite page at: https://fifthpittriverslecture.eventbrite.co.uk

Rapa Nui (Easter Island) is a small, remote, volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean, some 2500 km from its nearest neighbour and 4000km from mainland Chile. Its extreme isolation has governed its past and ongoing existence. Many myths and enigmas about Rapa Nui have been generated by the records of early explorers, folk memories surviving from a population that had declined to about 250 people by 1915, sensationalised concepts of self-induced eco-disaster, and by the public’s fascination with the idea of societal collapse associated with the demise of an iconic tradition of colossal statue construction (AD 1200 and 1550). Today, Rapa Nui’s population of about 6000 gains much of its income from heritage tourism. It is faced with highly challenging issues of sustaining a UNESCO-designated World Heritage Site which is undergoing physical erosion on an alarming scale. Over much of the past decade Rapa Nui Landscapes of Construction Project, funded by The British Academy and AHRC, has considered these issues and the results and future development of the project will be discussed in this lecture. The lecture will also consider how Rapa Nui’s living heritage, past and present, has complex social, ideological, and ecological interfaces that need to be understood and addressed on an island-wide scale and within a Polynesian context.

Biography

Professor Sue Hamilton is Director of the UCL Institute of Archaeology in London, its first female director. Her early research focused on prehistoric ceramics. Following appointment as a lecturer at the University of North London, and then UCL, she established two major UK landscape projects: the Caburn Hillfort and its South Downs Landscape, and the Bronze Age Landscapes of Bodmin Moor Project. More recently Sue has been advancing the application of phenomenology and sensory archaeology beyond their traditional boundaries with the Tavoliere Gargano Later Prehistory Project in southern Italy with Ruth Whitehouse. This was recently published as Neolithic Spaces: Social and Sensory Landscapes of the First Farmers of Italy. Overlapping with this she established, with Colin Richards, the Rapa Nui (Easter Island) Landscapes of Construction Project, which brings innovative methodologies and interpretative approaches to Pacific Studies. The project provides the first integrated response to the island’s 1996 inscription as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, combining landscape survey and environmental studies on an island-wide basis.

The lecture is presented by the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology in association with the Prehistoric Society.

The annual Pitt Rivers Lecture was established in 2017 as part of the celebrations marking 50 years of archaeological and anthropological teaching and research at Bournemouth University and its predecessor institutions. It is organized by staff and students, and presented in association with the Prehistoric Society. The lecture celebrates the achievements of General Pitt Rivers (1827– 1900), a distinguished Dorset-based archaeologist and anthropologist whose descendants still live in the area and have close connections with Bournemouth University.

Previous Pitt Rivers Lectures:

2017 - Richard Bradley (University of Reading) “Pitt Rivers as pioneer”

2018 - Alison Sheridan (National Museums Scotland) “Long before Brexit….”

2019 - Ruth Tringham (University of California, Berkeley, USA) “Fire: Friend or fiend?”

2020 - Chris Stringer (Natural History Museum) “The origins of our species”.

pitss river

CBA North West Spring Conference & AGM

Saturday 15th May, 11.30-14.30

The CBA North West Spring Conference and AGM 2021 will theme talks around regional 'Archaeology in Lockdown' during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

AGM

10.45: AGM Zoom registration

11.00: AGM

(A seperate zoom link will be provided for CBA NW members to attend the AGM)

Conference Programme

11.40: Conference Zoom registration and open for chat

11.50: Conference Introduction

12.00: "Thriving on the margins: the late Mesolithic and early Neolithic transition in the Fylde" - Fraser Brown, Oxford Archaeology North

12.30: "Isle of Man Ferry Terminal" - Mark Adams, RSK Environment Ltd

13.00: Comfort break

13:30: "Excavations at the site of Rossett, Wrexham" - Dr Caroline Pudney, The University of Chester

14.00: "The Archaeology of Lockdown" - Prof Howard Williams, The University of Chester

14.30: Questions and Close

To book please follow this link.

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